Wat Mai Souwannaphummaham

Wat Mai Souwannaphummaham

Overview

Built in 1796, Wat Mai (New Monastery) was given its present name following the restoration undertaken in 1821 by King Manthathourath. Notice the 4-tiered roof when visiting the temple, as well as the scenes from daily life and the legend of Vessantara on the bas-relief walls.

Open Hours

Open daily 08:00am – 17:00pm

Tickets: 10.000k/person

Access

Wat Mai Souwannaphummaham is located on the main street, just about 5 minutes walk from the city center before the National Museum.

Do's and Don'ts

- Cover yourself from shoulders to knees, take off hats and shoes.
- Respect the monks and novices. Women are not allowed to touch them.
- Do not show affection publicly.
- Refuse any antiques or you will be fined.

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